Ground Plaque in the historic McIntire District

Ground Plaque in the historic McIntire District

The McIntire District is an historic, architectural district created in 1981 by merging two 
previously established districts: the Chestnut Street Historic District (1971) and the 
Federal Street Area Historic District (1976). The neighborhood honors Salem's celebrated 
architect and woodcarver, Samuel McIntire. 

McIntire was one of the earliest and most influential architects in the United States. 
During Salem’s Golden Age of Commerce, he designed and oversaw the construction of 
many homes and helped give Salem its Federal-style look. He also created exquisite 
carvings for interior woodwork, furniture and ships for which he primarily made his 
living after 1790. His first major commission was the Peirce-Nichols House, which is 
owned and operated by the Peabody Essex Museum today. Hamilton Hall is also among 
the buildings and woodwork that is preserved within the district and through out Salem. 

The McIntire Historic District Architectural Walking Trail was developed by the 
National Park Service in cooperation with The Salem Partnership for visitors to admire 
the numerous Federal Era townhouses that create one of the most picturesque streetscapes 
in all of America. The district also boasts three historic churches, several monuments, and 
two notable cemeteries, including the Broad Street Burial Ground that dates back to 
1655.